Carey Perloff

Indian Ink - Brenda Meany, Roberta Maxwell

INDIAN INK

by Tom Stoppard

American Premiere 1999

Roundabout Theatre and A.C.T.  


"Astonishing! Sexy, funny and deeply entertaining"

–– JESSE GREEN, NEW YORK MAGAZINE


"Carey Perloff's delicate revival glories in Stoppard's longing for big theories and endless mysteries. Perloff's intimacy with this piece in particular and Stoppard's oeuvre in general adds to the fluidity and crispness of the production... the scenes crackle with intensity."

–– KAREN D'SOUZA, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS

 

Evocative and romantic, with a timeless sensuality and an accomplished cast.

—JENNIFER FARRAR, ASSOCIATED PRESS


INDIAN INK, A.C.T.,  2015

Brenda Meany, Roberta Maxwell, Photo by Kevin Berne

A.C.T. 2015


CAST

BRENDA MEANEY

AJAY NAIDU

ROBERTA MAXWELL

ANTHONY FUSCO

PEJ VAHDAT

FIRDOUS BAMJI

PHILIP MILLS

RAJEEV VARMA

VANDIT BHATT

KENNETH DE ABREW

MIKE RYAN

MARY BAIRD

DAN HIATT

DANIELLE FRIMER

GLENN STOTT

JASON KAPOOR

KAISO HILL

NEEL NORONHA

CREATIVE TEAM

NEIL PATEL, SET DESIGN

CANDICE DONNELLY, COSTUME DESIGN

ROBERT WIERZEL, LIGHTING DESIGN

DAN MOSES SCHREIER, ORIGINAL MUSIC AND SOUND DESIGN

JOHN CARRAFA, CHOREOGRAPHY

JANET FOSTER, CSA, CASTING

YEHRIN TONG, ORIGINAL ARTWORK

NANCY BENJAMIN, DIALECT COACHING

JONATHAN RIDER, FIGHT DIRECTION

A.C.T. 1999


CAST

FIRDOUS BAMJI

TOM BLAIR

DAVID CONRAD

KATHRYN CROSBY

SHELLY DESAI

SUSAN GIBNEY

KEN GRANTHAM

STEVEN ANTHONY JONES

ANIL KUMAR

ART MALIK

ROXANNE RAJA

DILEEP RAO

BRIAN KEITH RUSSELL

CHRISTOPHER RYDMAN

ADRIANA SEVAN

JEAN STAPLETON

ADAM SUDEMAN

AMIR TALAI

CREATIVE TEAM

LOY ARCENAS, SCENERY

WALKER HICKLIN, COSTUMES

FRANCES ARONSON, LIGHTING

MICHAEL ROTH,

    ORIGINAL MUSIC/SOUND SCORE

GARTH HEMPHILL, SOUND DESIGN

PAUL WALSH, DRAMATURG

DEBORAH SUSSEL, DIALECT CONSULTANT

ELLIE KLOPP, MOVEMENT CONSULTANT

GREGORY E. HOFFMAN, FIGHT DIRECTOR

MERYL LIND SHAW, CASTING

JUDY DENNIS, N.Y. AND L.A. CASTING

RICK ECHOLS, HAIR AND MAKEUP

ROB MELROSE, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR

ROUNDABOUT 2015


CAST

FIROUS BAMJI

BILL BUELL

NICK CHOKSI

ROMOLA GARAI

ROSEMARY HARRIS

NEAL HUFF

CAROLINE LAGERFELT

OMAR MASKATI

TIM MCGEEVER

BRENDA MEANEY

PHILIP MILLS

AJAY NAIDU

BHAVESH PATEL

LEE AARON ROSEN

RAJEEV VARMA

RAJESH BOSE

VANDIT BHATT

CLAIRE BROWNELL

MARK DAVID WATSON

CREATIVE TEAM

NEIL PATEL, SET DESIGN

CANDICE DONNELLY, COSTUME DESIGN

ROBERT WIERZEL, LIGHTING DESIGN

DAN MOSES SCHREIER, ORIGINAL MUSIC AND SOUND DESIGN

JOHN CARRAFA, CHOREOGRAPHER

JANET FOSTER, CSA, CASTING

YEHRIN TONG, ORIGINAL ARTWORK

GILLIAN LANE-PLESCIA, DIALECT COACHING

THOMAS SCHALL, FIGHT CONSULTANT

TOM WATSON, HAIR & WIG DESIGN

"Tom Stoppard, the creator of the (fictional) sisters Crewe, who are the leading characters of his “Indian Ink,” an enticing if overpacked play from 1995 that opened on Tuesday night at the Laura Pels Theater in its belated New York premiere. And no one should be disappointed by the news that Flora and Eleanor have been brought to life for the occasion by the equally exquisite Romola Garai, in her Off Broadway debut, and Rosemary Harris.

If you know your British actresses, you’ll also know that more than 50 years separate Ms. Garai and Ms. Harris, which makes it a bit odd that they should be cast as sisters, especially with Ms. Harris, who is in her 80s, portraying the younger of the two. But this is a play by Mr. Stoppard, who likes to warp and weave together different eras of history. And like many Stoppard plays, “Indian Ink” is about time, and what is lost and found or never retrieved in its rushing currents.

It is also about Anglo-Indian relations, and the distortions of thought and language that exist within that hyphenated concept; colonial subjugation and the cultural Stockholm syndrome it sometimes inspires; art as a public and private means of expression; the elusiveness of home in an international world; the niche literary industry devoted to beautiful female writers who led lives sensational or tragic (or preferably both); and the utter unreliability of recorded history.

That’s a lot of bases for one play to cover. As is his wont, Mr. Stoppard touches on them all, running from one to the other and back again, with great speed and alacrity. Yet, for once, the field seems too vast and varied to keep even his quicksilver intellect from occasionally flagging.

Unlike the similarly themed “Arcadia,” Mr. Stoppard’s 1993 masterwork, “Indian Ink” often seems stuck on its big, splashy surface when you want it to dive into the depths. But for Stoppard-addicted New Yorkers, there’s plenty to cherish. And they should thank the Roundabout Theater Company and the director Carey Perloff for finally bringing “Indian Ink” to New York."

–– BEN BRANTLEY, NEW YORK TIMES

“Rasa,” the Indian painter explains to the English poet in Tom Stoppard’s “Indian Ink,” is the classical Indian term for an artwork’s “juice. Its taste. Its essence. ... It is the emotion which the artist must arouse in you.” The American Conservatory Theater’s new take on “Ink” is steeped in rasa, so deeply in some scenes that it takes your breath away.


That restraint allows the story of the poet and the painter — Stoppard’s original concept for the piece — to emerge as the visceral essence of “Ink,” and Perloff’s actors make the most of it. Brenda Meaney, who played a smaller role in New York, is a magnetic Flora, as sensually alive as she is smart, endlessly curious and open to new experiences. As the painter Nirad Das, Firdous Bamji, who played Das’ son in the modern scenes in the ’99 production, embodies both colonial Indian deference and its percolating resentments in the ’30s as well as a passion for art that incrementally, inescapably extends to include the poet he’s painting."

– ROBERT HURWITT, SF CHRONICLE

INDIAN INK,  Rosemary Harris, Romola Garai, A.C.T., 2015

The New York Times; Photo by Sara Krulwich